Sep
20
to Sep 21

Urban Forms, Urban Lives

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Welcome and opening remarks, Piergiorgio Donatelli, Estelle Ferrarese

Sandra Laugier (Université Paris I-Panthéon-Sorbonne): Lives and the City: TV Fiction and Urban Forms of Life

AnthonyPecqueux (CNRS, CRESSON, Grenoble):A Sensitive Day in Bed-Stuy: How to Do the Right Thing?

Alexandra Richter (Université de Rouen): Morphology of Urban Forms and Lives: Walter Benjamin’s Arcades Project

Antonio Valentini (La Sapienza Università di Roma), Sens, vie et métropole: Quelques hypothèses de travail à partir de la lecture de Baudelaire

Piergiorgio Donatelli (La Sapienza Università di Roma):The Moral Experience of the City

Estelle Ferrarese (Université de Picardie Jules-Verne): Urban Form, Rational Lives. Los Angeles in Adorno’s Minima Moralia

MatthieuAmat (Université de Lausanne):In What Sense has a Form of Life a Content? The Case of “Urban Form of Life” in Simmel

Bhrigupati Singh (Brown University): Can a Neighborhood Fall Sick?

Clara Han (Johns Hopkins University): A Commemoration: Intimacy and Estrangement in Neighborhood Life

Sarin Marchetti (La Sapienza Università di Roma): The Uses of the City

Pierre Sauvetre (Université de Paris Ouest-Nanterre): The Commune as a Form of Life in Common: from Aristotle to the ZAD


Stefano Velotti (La Sapienza Università di Roma): Urban Forms and Forms of Life: an Ethico-aesthetic Perspective

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Apr
24
9:30 AM09:30

Democracy and Forms of Life

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9.30-9.45     Welcome and opening remarks Estelle Ferrarese and Roberto Frega

9.45-10.45   Francesca Raimondi (Kunstakademie Düsseldorf): The time of democracy

10.45-11.45 Hanna Eklund (Sciences Po): The peoples of Europe', law, forms of life

11.45-12.00 Coffee Break

12.00-13.00 Roberto Frega (Centre Marc Bloch): Does democracy need a social ontology?

14.00-15.00 Jörg Volbers (Freie Universität Berlin): Autonomy as Dependency. Dewey on the Nature of Rationality

15.00-16.00 Sandra Laugier (Université de Paris I): Radical democracy, self-reliance, and the new age of disobedience

16.00-16.15 Coffee Break

16.15-17.15 Ada Reichhart  (Université de Picardie Jules Verne): “Inhabiting work” and forms of life : how to tackle the democratic project of worker cooperatives

17.15-18.15 Dirk Jörke (Technische Universität Darmstadt): The Rationality of the Irrational. Voting and Non-Voting in Post-Democratic Times

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Nov
26
to Nov 27

Avoidance and Appearance of the Child in Forms of Life

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AVOIDANCE AND APPEARANCE OF CHILDHOOD

 

Workshop Schedule

Day 1: 26th November, Sunday

 

Panel 1: Avoidance of the Child 10:00 - 12:00 A.M

 

Orna Ophir (New York University)
Precocity, Pseudo-Maturity, and the Model-Child: Psychoanalytic Thoughts on the Avoidance of Childhood

Perig Pitrou (Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
Ritual for Children and The Emergence of a New Center of Activities in some Amerindian Societies

Estelle Ferrarese (Université de Picardie Jules Verne)
Forms of life as coagulations in a very material sense - Some thoughts on the polyphony of current uses of the idea of form of life

Lunch Break: 12:00 A.M - 1 P.M

Panel 2: Shadow of the child 1:00 - 2:30 P.M

Veena Das (Johns Hopkins University)
A Child Comes into View: Fragments of Memory

Sandra Laugier (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne) Founding fathers, found children

Coffee Break: 2:30 - 2:45 P.M

 

Panel 3: Child’s Voice

2:45 - 4:45

Clara Han (Johns Hopkins University)
Learning Korean, Learning Kinship: Betrayal and Belonging in Language

Andrew Brandel (Harvard University) German, Again: Mother tongues, child tongues

Yves Erard (Université de Lausanne)
Children’s claim and the Transmission of Language

Anne Eakin Moss (Johns Hopkins University) Child’s Play and Soviet Wonder

4:45 - 5:00 P.M
Hent De Vries (Johns Hopkins University/New York University) Final Remarks

Day 2: 27th November, Monday

Panel 4: Scenes of Learning 10:00 A.M - 12:00 P.M

Marco Motta (Johns Hopkins University)
The Adjacent World of Adults. Children witnessing parental decay in The Sound and the Fury

Paola Marrati (Johns Hopkins University) Learning and Knowing

Piergiorgio Donatelli (Sapienza Università di Roma) Initiation and Education: Wittgenstein, Cavell and Children

 

Lunch: 12:00 - 1:00 P.M 

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Sep
14
to Sep 15

Alternative Contemporary Ethics

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From the 1980s on, a number of objections have been leveled against the still-dominant paradigm of moral theory in moral philosophy focusing mainly on the development of prescriptive, universalist theories, often independently of our ordinary social and natural contexts. Such criticism and new perspectives in ethics trod different paths. Representatives of the Wittgensteinian tradition, pragmatism, virtues ethics, care ethics, and critical theory each offered different diagnoses of and suggestions to this dominant tradition. In particular, it has been variously voiced the concern for the feasibility and opportunity of “top down” approaches to moral theory, which in its three components (meta-ethics, normative ethics and applied ethics) has progressively eroded the scope as well as the very relevance of ordinary moral life, exasperating the role and weight of prescriptive theorizing in ethics, according to which the role of philosophy would be that of dictating particular solutions to the various problems afflicting ordinary life.

Against this picture, the centrality of first person moral experience and personal relationships has been vindicated, commencing, in so doing, a new course for moral philosophy altogether. According to these heterodox positions, moral philosophy should assist and ameliorate the moral life by thinking itself anew as one practice among others, rather than as a theoretical device operating from above the thread of human activities and practices as well as from above the yet more comprehensive thread of vital and social coexistences of which non-human animals, environments, and social and economical processes are an integrant part.

The conference aims at articulating these lines of research, showing at the same time the connections and trades between these different alternative contemporary ethical traditions.

The event is organized by Piergiorgio Donatelli and Anne-Marie Christensen.

PROGRAM
Thursday, 14 – The Danish Academy in Rome

9:15-9:45 Registration and coffee
9.45-10.00 Piergiorgio Donatelli (Sapienza) and Anne-

Marie Christensen (USD)

Opening Remarks

10.00-11.00 Lars Hertzberg (Åbo Academi)

Absolutely Personal: Ethics out of Swansea

11.00-12.00 Anne-Marie Christensen (SDU)

How is Moral Philosophy Practical?

12.00-12.30 coffee break 12.30-13.30 Sandra Laugier (Paris 1)

Ethics and the Perception of Importance

13.30-14.30 lunch

14:30-15:30 Silver Bronzo (Moscow)

Moral Perfectionism and the Enlightenment in

Stanley Cavell and Pier Paolo Pasolini

15.30-16.30 Caterina Botti (Sapienza)

Revisiting Care Ethics as an Ethics for Present

Times

16:30-17 coffee break
17.00-18.00 Estelle Ferrarese (Université de Picardie)

Adorno’s Vulnerable Moral Agent

 

Friday, 15 – Dipartimento di Filosofia, Sapienza Università di Roma

09.30-10.30 Danielle Petherbridge (UCD)

Recognition and Ethical Responsiveness

10.30-11.30 Piergiorgio Donatelli (Sapienza)

Perfectionism and Virtue

11.30-12.00 coffee break
12:00-13.00 Sarin Marchetti (Sapienza)

Therapy and Transformation in Pragmatist Ethics

13.00-14.00 lunch

14.00-15.00 Nora Hämäläinen (Pardubice)

A Case for Moral History – Universality and

Change in Ethics after Wittgenstein

15.00-16.00 Martin Gustafsson (Åbo Academi)

What's So Particular About Morality?

16.00-16.30 coffee break
16.30-17.30 Oskari Kuusela (East Anglia)

Wittgenstein and the Unity of Good

17:30- 18:30 James Conant (University of Chicago)

TBA

18:30-19.00 Concluding remarks

 

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De la Fragilité du Bien à la Justice Poétique: Poétique, Éthique et Politique de Martha Nussbaum
Jun
26
to Jun 27

De la Fragilité du Bien à la Justice Poétique: Poétique, Éthique et Politique de Martha Nussbaum

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À l'occasion des traductions françaises de ses livres The Fragility of Goodness et de Poetic Justice, ce colloque se propose d'explorer deux aspects complémentaires de l'œuvre de Martha Nussbaum.

The Fragility of Goodness, paru en 1986 et traduit en français en 2016, est le premier ouvrage à développer systématiquement l'usage original que M. Nussbaum fait des textes littéraires comme philosophie à part entière. Elle fait dialoguer systématiquement auteurs tragiques et philosophes grecs antiques, autour de trois idées forces : l’ambition et la fragilité chez les tragiques, le bien sans la fragilité chez Platon et la fragilité d’une vie humaine bonne. Le résultat de cette confrontation est la compréhension approfondie d’un thème, celui de « chance morale » (moral luck), autrement dit de la vulnérabilité de ce qui constitue le bien à l’égard des circonstances et des hasards.

Poetic Justice, paru dix ans plus tard et traduit en français en 2015, aborde la transposition des concepts clés de la philosophie normative de Nussbaum - empathie, émotions, imagination - au champ de la philosophie politique et de la vie publique. L’enjeu est de comprendre le rôle de ces concepts clés dans la correction (mieux : la justesse) des raisonnements et des jugements relevant des domaines publics (politique, droit, questions sociales, etc.). Derrière cette description renouvelée des raisonnements apparaît une autre conception de la raison, non pas impartiale et désincarnée, mais fondée sur une appréciation des situations humaines particulières.

L'objet du colloque est de revenir en compagnie de Martha Nussbaum sur ces deux facettes de l'œuvre, morale et politique. Dans quelle mesure cette compréhension renouvelée du raisonnement est-elle une réponse aux difficultés soulevées dans La fragilité du bien ? Peut-on espérer qu’elle limite les effets de la vulnérabilité du bien ? Quelles sont les vertus de l’usage des émotions, de l’imagination, de l’empathie, concernant le raisonnement pratique ? Autant de questions auxquelles les différents intervenants tenteront de répondre.

26 juin 2017

Solange CHAVEL (SIRIS Academic), Sandra LAUGIER (PARIS 1, ISJPS) – 10h30-11h Présentation

Martha NUSSBAUM (Université de Chicago) – 11h-12h
« Powerlessness and the Politics of Blame. A Philosopher Looks at Our Political Crisis »

Monique CANTO-SPERBER (CNRS, République des Savoirs, ENS-CNRS) – 12h-12h45 « Les passions et le droit de parler »

Antoine GARAPON (Institution des hautes études sur la justice) – 14h30-15h15 « Justice sans paroles. Les formes élémentaires du jugement »

Marie GARRAU (Univ. Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, ISJPS) – 15h15-16h « La vulnérabilité : implications éthiques et politiques »

Jean-Cassien BILLIER (Univ. Paris-Sorbonne) – 16h30-17h15 « Martha Nussbaum et la liberté religieuse »

Raoul MOATI (Univ. Chicago) – 17h15-18h « Poétique et politique »

27 juin 2017

Olivier RENAUT (Univ. Paris-Nanterre) – 9h30-10h15 « Les émotions grecques et les nôtres »

Panel 1 Vulnérabilité 10h30-13h
animé par Sophie GUÉRARD DE LATOUR (Paris 1, ISJPS)

Estelle FERRARESE (Univ. Picardie Jules Verne, CURAPP)
« La vulnérabilité “aux circonstances” relève-t-elle de la politique ? »

Daniele LORENZINI (Facultés Saint-Louis, Bruxelles) « La fragilité de l’intellect » 

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Contemplating Vulnerable Forms of Life
May
16
10:00 AM10:00

Contemplating Vulnerable Forms of Life

 ● 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM: International Network Planning Session, Room 9205 Members of each team will discuss their plans for their conference on vulnerable forms followed by a group discussion about the trajectory of the project over the next four years.  o 10:00 – 10:15 Genealogy of the Project (Sandra Laugier/Estelle Ferrarese) o 10:15 – 10:30 Centre Marc Bloch (Estelle Ferrarese) o 10:30 – 10:45 University Paris 1 (Sandra Laugier) o 10:45 – 11:00 Humbolt University (Rahel Jaeggi)  o 11:00 – 11:15 Sapienza University of Rome (Piergiorgio Donatelli) o 11:15 – 11:30 C UNY (Alyson Cole/Linda Alcoff/Michelle Fine) o 11:30 – 11:45 Johns Hopkins (Clara Han/Veena Das/Paola Marrati) o 11:45 – 12:00 EPIDAPO (Anne Le Goff/Eric Vilain)  o 12:00 – 1:00 Group Meeting  ● 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM: Lunch, Room 5200 A light lunch will be provided in the Political Science Department’s Thesis Room on the fifth floor, Room 5200.  ● 3:00 – 5:00: Public Session, Room 9205 Professor Veena Das presents “The Boundaries of ‘We’: Cruelty, Responsibility, and Forms of Life” followed by a discussion.  o Welcome, Thanks and Introduction, Alyson Cole o Comments, Estelle Ferrarese  ● 6:45 PM: Dinner ( Cafe Loup @ 105 West 13th Street) Participants are cordially invited to join us for dinner after the day’s program.  This event is part of an international collaborative project dedicated to interdisciplinary research on vulnerable forms of life funded by the Centre National de la Recherché Scientifique in France with the Support of the Provost's Office and the Political Science Program. Thanks also to the Provost's Office and the PhD/MA Program in Political Science.

● 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM: International Network Planning Session, Room 9205
Members of each team will discuss their plans for their conference on vulnerable forms followed by a group discussion about the trajectory of the project over the next four years.

o 10:00 – 10:15 Genealogy of the Project (Sandra Laugier/Estelle Ferrarese) o 10:15 – 10:30 Centre Marc Bloch (Estelle Ferrarese)
o 10:30 – 10:45 University Paris 1 (Sandra Laugier)
o 10:45 – 11:00 Humbolt University (Rahel Jaeggi)

o 11:00 – 11:15 Sapienza University of Rome (Piergiorgio Donatelli) o 11:15 – 11:30 C UNY (Alyson Cole/Linda Alcoff/Michelle Fine)
o 11:30 – 11:45 Johns Hopkins (Clara Han/Veena Das/Paola Marrati) o 11:45 – 12:00 EPIDAPO (Anne Le Goff/Eric Vilain)

o 12:00 – 1:00 Group Meeting

● 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM: Lunch, Room 5200
A light lunch will be provided in the Political Science Department’s Thesis Room on the fifth floor, Room 5200.

● 3:00 – 5:00: Public Session, Room 9205
Professor Veena Das presents “The Boundaries of ‘We’: Cruelty, Responsibility, and Forms of Life” followed by a discussion.

o Welcome, Thanks and Introduction, Alyson Cole o Comments, Estelle Ferrarese

● 6:45 PM: Dinner ( Cafe Loup @ 105 West 13th Street)
Participants are cordially invited to join us for dinner after the day’s program.

This event is part of an international collaborative project dedicated to interdisciplinary research on vulnerable forms of life funded by the Centre National de la Recherché Scientifique in France with the Support of the Provost's Office and the Political Science Program. Thanks also to the Provost's Office and the PhD/MA Program in Political Science.

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The meaning of care in different traditions
Mar
14
10:30 AM10:30

The meaning of care in different traditions

 The goal of the present workshop is first to discover the diversity of the meaning of Care and how the word “ Care”, which is not translated in either French or in Japanese, is understood and appropriated. Equally another goal is to go beyond these different forms of reception, to find out a common ground and to share some ways in order to deepen this thought. Because “Care” focuses on relations of dependence and autonomy and on the problem of responsibility to others, this concept helps us to place the vulnerability at the center of the forms of human life, and henceforth in democracy.  This workshop will bring together Japanese and French scholars who examine “Care” from the concerns of our human lives, caring practices, gender, politics.  Morning Session 10:30-11:10: Ueno Chizuko (Ritsumeikan University) Theory of Care: from labor of love to care work  11:10-11:50 Patricia Paperman (Paris 8 University) Understanding Care through care work  11:50-12:30 : Discussion  Afternoon Session 13:30-14:10: Estelle Ferrarese (Strasbourg University) The shared premises of the ethics of care and Hegelian theories of recognition: Vulnerability as Moral Category 14:10-14:50: Yayo Okano (Doshisha University) Toward an Origin of Care Ethics: Is a “Family” the Last Bastion against Neoliberalism? Break 15:15-15:55:Sandra Laugier (Paris 1 University) Care and Responsibility for ordinary others 15:55-16:30: Anne Gonon (Doshisha University)  From Hiratsuka Raichô to the Fukushima nuclear disaster – few problems about care practices Break 16:45-18:00: Round table  Place: Room SK214 Shikokan  Conducted in English No Appointment Necessary  Co Organised by Doshisha Feminist Gender Sexuality Studies Center Sponsored by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B) , “A Democratic Turn of Care Ethics” (the Principal Investigator: Yayo Okano), and GDRI CNRS/France: Vulnérabilité et dynamique des formes de vie.

The goal of the present workshop is first to discover the diversity of the meaning of Care and how the word “ Care”, which is not translated in either French or in Japanese, is understood and appropriated. Equally another goal is to go beyond these different forms of reception, to find out a common ground and to share some ways in order to deepen this thought. Because “Care” focuses on relations of dependence and autonomy and on the problem of responsibility to others, this concept helps us to place the vulnerability at the center of the forms of human life, and henceforth in democracy.

This workshop will bring together Japanese and French scholars who examine “Care” from the concerns of our human lives, caring practices, gender, politics.

Morning Session
10:30-11:10: Ueno Chizuko (Ritsumeikan University)
Theory of Care: from labor of love to care work

11:10-11:50 Patricia Paperman (Paris 8 University)
Understanding Care through care work

11:50-12:30 : Discussion

Afternoon Session
13:30-14:10: Estelle Ferrarese (Strasbourg University) The shared premises of the ethics of care and Hegelian theories of recognition: Vulnerability as Moral Category
14:10-14:50: Yayo Okano (Doshisha University) Toward an Origin of Care Ethics: Is a “Family” the Last Bastion against Neoliberalism?
Break
15:15-15:55:Sandra Laugier (Paris 1 University) Care and Responsibility for ordinary others
15:55-16:30: Anne Gonon (Doshisha University)

From Hiratsuka Raichô to the Fukushima nuclear disaster – few problems about care practices Break
16:45-18:00: Round table

Place: Room SK214 Shikokan

Conducted in English No Appointment Necessary

Co Organised by Doshisha Feminist Gender Sexuality Studies Center
Sponsored by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B) , “A Democratic Turn of Care Ethics” (the Principal Investigator: Yayo Okano), and GDRI CNRS/France: Vulnérabilité et dynamique des formes de vie.

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